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Wesley Students Present at Research Symposium


Pictured Front row (from left): Wesley Professor of Chemistry Malcolm D'Souza, Catherine Gross, Dionne Williams, Megan Durrant, Mabel D'Souza, Jasbir Deol, Laura Malinowski, Wesley Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies Stephanie Stotts, Brittany Kowalewski, James Welsh

Back row: Ariel Bilbrough, Maitreyi Dave, Samantha Weber, Katelyn Null, Alora Wilson, Victor DeBarros, Kyle Frame, Wesley Professor of Mathematics Derald Wentzien, John Dougherty, Riza Bautista, and Kwadwo Nsiah


Eleven NSF-EPSCoR, one NASA-EPSCoR and six NIH-INBRE-sponsored students presented research at the 2014 Undergraduate Research and Service Celebratory Symposium at the University of Delaware’s Clayton Hall Conference Center on Aug. 14. Fifteen of the students, and five of their seven academic mentors, were from Wesley College.
 
Dr. Derald Wentzien, professor of mathematics, mentored two Wesley students, Riza Bautista and Brittany Kowalewski, in their research. Visiting Assistant Professor and Graduate Director of Environmental Sciences Kent Hurst co-mentored Brittany on her project.
 
Professor of Biology Jonathan Kidd worked with Maitreyi Dave and Mabel D’Souza of the Charter School of Wilmington for their projects in microbiology.
 
Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies Stephanie Stotts supervised three Wesley students, John Dougherty, Samantha Weber and James Welsh. She also mentored Delaware Tech student Nsiah Kwadwo.
 
Eight Wesley students, Ariel Bilbrough, Victor DeBarros, Jasbir Deol, Megan Durrant, Catherine Gross, Katelyn Null, Dionne Williams and Alora Wilson, worked with Wesley Professor of Chemistry Dr. Malcolm D’Souza while conducting their organic chemistry research.
 
Dr. Katia Sol-Church of Nemours Alfred I. duPont Children’s Hospital mentored Wesley student Laura Malinowski.
 
Wesley student Kyle Frame worked with Susan Love of the Delaware Department of National Resources & Environmental Control for his project. Dr. Stotts was a co-mentor on this project.
 
“This was a tremendous opportunity for our students,” D’Souza said. “I’m proud of the STEM majors and the great work they did.”
 
More than 350 participants took part at the Symposium, which provides scholars with an opportunity to display their projects and findings via oral or poster presentations. The event spans a variety of subject areas, including S-STEM topics like biological science and math.
 
The specific grants that made the Wesley student research possible included National Science Foundation (NSF) EPSCoR Grant No. IIA-1301765 (DE-EPSCoR RII-3), the National Institute of General Medical Sciences - NIGMS (8 P20 GM103446-13) from the National Institutes of Health (DE-INBRE) and the NASA Training Grant NNG05GO92H (DESGC).